Difficult Truths and Honest Friendships

“True friendship, we think, means unconditional acceptance and support. The true friend validates your feelings, takes your side in every argument, helps you feel good about yourself at all times, and never ever judges you. But Austen didn’t believe that. For her, being happy means becoming a better person, and becoming a better person means having your mistakes pointed out to you in a way that you can’t ignore. Yes, a true friend wants you to be happy, but being happy and feeling good about yourself are not the same things. In fact, they can sometimes be diametrically opposed. True friends do not shield you from your mistakes, they tell you about them: even at the risk of losing your friendship-which means, even at the risk of being unhappy themselves.”
William Deresiewicz on A Jane Austen Education.

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2 comments

  1. Isaac · November 21, 2013

    Being a good friend should never come to the detriment of your happiness. Klassily writting post. 🙂

  2. Pingback: 3 Poisons That Kill Friendships | Klassily

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